Dataloggers in the Science Curriculum

From the Science National Curriculum: 

Working Scientifically using the Labdisc datalogger from Globisens

During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

Labdisc

Labdisc

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

Charts

  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

Charts1

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.

In Key Stage 3 Data loggers can be used across all disciplines Biology, Physics and Chemistry

 

HireTECH

If you are planning to incorporate analysis and set up experiments next half term then consider hiring a set of Dataloggers. Four Labdiscs with external sensors or four Mini Labdiscs with external sensors. Free software download for any operating system with examples. All the devices have GPS to allow experiments and sensor readings to be mapped to Google maps.

More information

 

Lack of Budget is a barrier to young people learning!

40 per cent of secondary schools state ‘lack of budget’ is a key barrier to using EdTech, according to a survey for the British Educational Suppliers (Besa) – a sharp increase from 14 per cent in 2017.

We are trying to help schools to put digital technology into the hands of young people.

This is a General Science data logger. It is easy to use, comes with 13 sensors built-in and includes GPS.

The software that goes with the Labdisc is free on all platforms. Students are able to log their own data in real-time and see the changes using GPS and Google Maps. Interrogate data inline, table and graph format. Annotate data to show understanding. Export to other tools for presentation.

The Labdisc costs £377.00 plus VAT and delivery. Whilst this is expensive, the device has some high-end functionality and includes delicate instrumentation it is also value for money. We want young people to have access to this type of technology and so we have packaged four devices including external sensors (pH probe) for hire to schools.

So a set of four General Science dataloggers can be hired for a half-term period (notionally 6 weeks) for £377.00 +VAT and delivery. simply go to

https://www.tyncan.com/hiretech

We are passionate about technology and we want to help schools with their budget constraints.

We hope you have a lovely Summer break.

 

 

 

 

Ocean Literacy

Young Ocean Leaders Wanted

The World Oceans Day Youth Advisory Council is expanding for 2018 by adding 10 new young ocean leaders from around the world! Applications are due by 1 December 2017.

The World Oceans Day Youth Advisory Council helps to expand the reach and impact of World Oceans Day, on 8 June, and year-round. Council members are instrumental in helping shape the development of World Oceans Day as it grows, providing new and unique perspectives, ideas, and recommendations. Find out more

To apply you must be between the ages of 16 and 22, able to make at least a two-year commitment, including approximately 5-10 hours per month to Council activities and have a passion for the ocean! Apply now

 

EXCELLENT USE OF LABDISC DATALOGGERS

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 Great American Eclipse!:
Labdisc Records Solar Eclipse at Multiple US Locations


Students from Fulton county Schools view the eclipse with ISO glasses next to their Labdisc experiment.

Last week, on Monday the 21st the United States experienced a solar eclipse, the first recorded in the country for almost 100 years. During this total solar eclipse, the moon’s diameter appeared larger than the sun’s, blocking all direct sunlight and transforming day into complete darkness.

The path of total eclipse touched 14 states, 16% of the area of the United States and a partial eclipse visible in all the other states. The event began on the Oregon coast as a partial eclipse at 9:06 a.m. (PDT) and ended later that day as a partial eclipse along the South Carolina coast at about 4:06 p.m. (EDT).

What better opportunity for budding young scientists to use the
Labdisc to record a real and live scientific event!

Together with science students, the Globisens team and their US partner Boxlight – recorded the eclipse in Georgia and New York, with Globisens CEO, Dov Bruker recording in Mexico.  Recording with the Labdisc in multiple locations of the eclipse allowed the young scientists to compare the eclipse duration and the lowest level of light as the eclipse traversed the continent.

In Johns Creek, Georgia a group of students from Fulton County Schools setup a Labdisc using the Labdisc plastic rod and a bucket of sand to stabilize it. They recorded the results over a 2-hour period. The eclipse started with a recorded 40,000 lux and decreased to only 256 lux and then increased back to around 35,000 lux when the eclipse concluded. The students also used a home-made box projector to view the shadow created by the eclipse.
    

As the sensor-triggered street lights turned on during the eclipse, our young students made several additional observations regarding the natural world around them. They noticed that the birds stopped chirping, and the cicada’s (large insect) and crickets started making noise, which they normally do only after sunset.

See more innovative experiment projects using the Labdisc from around the world

Outdoor Learning report

outdoor learning

Children learning outside

So at last what many of us have instinctively understood is backed by evidence from England’s largest outdoor learning project. The weight of evidence is compelling. A hefty 95 percent of children surveyed said outdoor learning makes lessons more enjoyable, 90 percent said they felt happier and 72 percent said that they got on better with others

Read the full report here